At the very least, you should be able to admit and accept when you know – or rather when the facts show – that it would never work in the long run.

Alasko: I consider myself a kind person, but I've never figured out a way to tell someone I've been dating that I'm no longer interested.

Usually I try to get the message across by not answering the phone, etc., but that doesn't feel very good.

This isn't easy, as getting to know someone takes time.

On average it takes about two years for the full honeymoon period to blow over, then you begin seeing flaws in the other person.

My friends tell me that it's too cruel to come right out and tell the person that I don't want to see them again.

What's the best way that's not hurtful to stop dating someone?

And yes, it takes courage to talk to someone in person and say, "I'm sorry but I don't think we're a good match, and I don't want to continue seeing you." And while it may seem "kinder" to avoid saying these words, don't lie to yourself that you're being evasive in order to avoid hurting the other person.

Being evasive and deceptive is simply taking the slippery way out.

However, when we fall in love, our minds don't just see a person – we see the person that we perceive.

When we're in love we don't just perceive the person that is in front of us, but what that person means to us. But when we first fall in love we overlook these truths and usually choose to ignore them all together. First off, if you're looking to spend your life with anyone, then you should firstly accept the fact that you're dating someone who comes with just as much baggage, just as many issues and just as many nasty habits as everyone else.

Nor will we meaninglessly compliment each other to alleviate your own anxiety, as in "You're really a great person, but …" 3) To hint at no longer wanting to date by being "busy" is dishonest and disrespectful; instead, if either of us wants to stop, we’ll the other person directly, which is both respectful and caring.